Everybody, Somebody, Anybody and Nobody

keith reinhard quote vertical comp

Worth repeating even on Wordless Wednesday. Anybody out there know these people?

Share

(Mostly) Wordless Wednesday

 

Furiously wrapping! Follow us on Pinterest for more of what we love :)

 

Share

(Mostly) Wordless Wednesday

Source: tumblr.com via Lieneke on Pinterest

 

Participate in Breast Cancer Awareness Month easily and stylishly with free BCA messages from Unvelope. And follow us on Pinterest to see more of what we love!

 

Share

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Send a Card, Save a Life

Heart-shaped lily

My family’s gynecologist saved my mother’s life twice. When I was 5 years old, he discovered her ovarian cancer in time to treat it. My younger sister and I didn’t know what was going on. The treatment took a long time but, thankfully, she recovered, we grew up, and I didn’t really give it much thought. Youth and a protective family environment has its advantages.

I don’t think I even realized she’d had cancer until sometime in high school when I revisited old family photos and, seeing my mother hairless from chemo, put two and two together. While I was away at college, she made it through breast cancer too.

Continue reading…

Share

Seeing Life Through Our Personal Perspective

Cancer survivor, hospice volunteer, husband, father, Professor Emeritus at San Francisco State University and all around “wise” man, Stan Goldberg, Ph.D. never ceases to amaze me with his uncommon common sense, sense of other and overall insight into human behavior. Dr. Goldberg’s recent post, Seeing Life Through Our Personal History: It’s a Gray world, gives clarity to why “most of us believe the world should be viewed as we see it and how otherwise, “shocked” we are when there is a “discrepancy between the right way—ours—and the ‘wrong’ way.”

The inability to see another’s view from their perspective does, indeed, lead to much discord, discontent, anger, hurt and, surely, global conflict. What a far better world this might be if we could put into practice and pass along Dr. Goldberg’s sage advice  with the hope of opening more hearts and minds to his view on “understanding rather than condemning.” “Righteous judgments and moral outrage,” he says, “move us to the past—things that have already happened. It does little to explain why something occurred or was said. And, more importantly, offers little guidance for the future.”

Continue reading…

Share